Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Cycling in the rain of the Netherlands

This last week, cycling to work has been an absolute pleasure. The weather has been perfect for cycling on a morning (cool but dry and sunny); in fact, since the snow cleared, we've had pretty much perfect cycling weather in Darlington for the last three or four months.

But I still see the same few cyclists on the roads and bike paths. maybe three or four other riders on a good day, on my 2.5 mile to work that goes through the town centre.

Meanwhile, on a rainy day in Utrecht in the Netherlands...



(Mark Wagenbuur's excellent video found via David Hembrow's excellent blog: A view from the cycle path - Utrecht in the rain

5 comments:

Inconvenient Truth said...

As a certain film concludes, It's the Infrastructure, Stupid!

Inconvenient Truth said...

Taking a closer look at the buildings, this road was probably built in the 70s or 80s - just when our inner ring road was built.

As we repeatedly point out, we cannot expect UK authorities to compensate for such past mistakes instantly. But perhaps admitting these mistakes would help clarify what encourages - and what discourages - cycling.

wuppidoc said...

There is ample space on Darlington's main and busy roads, the arterial roads, that could be reallocated without hurting motorists. It is public space......

The people in Holland are simply uses to cycling even in the rain, they use their umbrellas, I did that as a kid as well and still do it.

Bobbi Holberg said...

The danger with biking during rainy days is the wet roads. It is more prone to road disasters. I think cyclists must wear protective gears like helmet and boots. There are cases that drivers can't notice a cyclist approaching. That's why some wear an Ansi safety vest when they're traveling along a highway.

Richard Grassick said...

Interesting comment, Bobby. But after viewing the film, surely you must conclude that your idea of "cycling" has nothing to do with this example of "cycling"? I didn't see one instance of cyclists mixing with motorised traffic in the film.

Your linguistic slip - generalising your idea of "cycling" as if it were universal - is exactly what transportation authorities do over and over.